Puerto Rico Covid Map and Case Count

0
500
1,000 cases
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
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Oct.
New cases
7-day average
Total reported On Oct. 21 14-day change
Cases 58,830 187 +10%
Deaths 774 5 –27%
Hospitalized 378 +4%

Day with data reporting anomaly.

Includes confirmed and probable cases where available. 14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

At least 5 new coronavirus deaths and 187 new cases were reported in Puerto Rico on Oct. 21. Over the past week, there have been an average of 473 cases per day, an increase of 10 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

As of Thursday morning, there have been at least 58,830 cases and 774 deaths in Puerto Rico since the beginning of the pandemic, according to a New York Times database.

Average daily cases per 100,000 people in past week
Few or no cases
Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Sources: State and local health agencies. Population and demographic data from Census Bureau.
About this data For total cases and deaths: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by county. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness. For per capita: Parts of a county with a population density lower than 10 people per square mile are not shaded. For hot spots: The hot spots map shows the share of population with a new reported case over the last week. Parts of a county with a population density lower than 10 people per square mile are not shaded.

Reported cases and deaths by municipality

This table is sorted by places with the most cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Charts are colored to reveal when outbreaks emerged.

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Cases
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Deaths
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Weekly cases per capita
Fewer More
Puerto Rico 58,830 1,737 774 23 3,314 98 32 0.9
March 1
Oct. 21
Puerto Rico heatmap
Carolina 3,692 2,500 387 262
Carolina heatmap
Corozal 810 2,506 66 204
Corozal heatmap
Dorado 989 2,764 71 198
Dorado heatmap
San Sebastián 621 1,742 68 191
San Sebastián heatmap
San Juan 9,481 2,954 510 159
San Juan heatmap
Cataño 565 2,431 36 155
Cataño heatmap
Toa Alta 1,585 2,229 102 143
Toa Alta heatmap
Fajardo 682 2,296 41 138
Fajardo heatmap
Canóvanas 850 1,919 61 138
Canóvanas heatmap
Bayamón 4,538 2,662 231 135
Bayamón heatmap
About this data Weekly cases per capita shows the share of population with a new reported case for each week. Weeks without a reported case are shaded gray. The table includes new cases and deaths that were reported in the last seven days.

The New York Times is engaged in a comprehensive effort to track details about every reported case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. The numbers in this article are being updated several times a day based on the latest information our journalists are gathering from around the country.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Daily reported new cases

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500
1,000 cases
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
New cases
7-day average

Daily reported deaths

0
10
20 deaths
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a data reporting anomaly. Read more here. Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

Daily case and death reports show the severity of the pandemic over time. The picture can be put into further context by considering the number of tests performed and people hospitalized.

Daily reported specimens tested

0
20,000
40,000
60,000 tests
March
April
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June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
New tests
7-day average

Hospitalizations

0
200
400
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Covid patients in hospitals each day
7-day average
Source: Testing and hospitalization data from the Covid Tracking Project.
About this data Currently hospitalized is the number of patients with Covid-19 reported by the state to be in a hospital on that day. Dips and spikes could be due to inconsistent reporting by hospitals. Tests represent the number of individual P.C.R. viral test specimens reported tested that day.

If the previous level of testing was low, and hospitalizations are not increasing, a rise in daily cases could be explained as a result of increased testing. If daily tests have been increased and cases and hospitalizations have fallen or stayed low, that is a sign that the situation is improving or under control. Hospitalizations and deaths usually lag behind new cases, as it takes time for symptoms to develop and worsen.

Because the definitions used for testing and hospitalization data vary between states, it is not always possible to compare that data in one state to the figures reported in another.

We’re tracking what has reopened in Puerto Rico »

Since March, The Times has paid special attention to cases in nursing homes, food processing plants, correctional facilities and now at colleges and universities. Information on cases linked to these places comes from official releases by governments, companies and institutions directly. The Times is publishing lists of groupings of 50 or more cases related to a specific site, workplace, school or event.

Cases connected to Cases Location
+ Colleges and universities 3 cases at 1 school

About the data

In data for Puerto Rico, the Times primarily relies on reports from the territory. Puerto Rico typically releases new data each day. Weekend counts may be lower because fewer sources report to the territory.

The Times has identified the following reporting anomalies or methodology changes in the data:

April 12: Puerto Rico started including some probable Covid-19 related deaths. From April 19 to April 22, the territory stopped reporting probable deaths and then continued again on April 23.

April 21: The territory's health department revised their number of cases downward, saying they had been double counting some coronavirus patients in official reports, leading to a higher number of cases reported than actually confirmed.

The territorial health department acknowledged in late April that it had been double-counting some patients. That issue had been resolved by early May, officials said.

Muncipality-level weekly cases per capita are shown starting in early May, when the Times began gathering the data.

The tallies on this page include probable and confirmed cases and deaths.

Confirmed cases and deaths, which are widely considered to be an undercount of the true toll, are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a molecular laboratory test. Probable cases and deaths count individuals who meet criteria for other types of testing, symptoms and exposure, as developed by national and local governments.

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.

Read more about the methodology and download county-level data for coronavirus cases in the United States from The New York Times on GitHub.