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See How All 50 States Are Reopening (and Closing Again)

Reopened Reopening Pausing Reversing
Click a state to see more detail

All 50 states had begun to reopen in some way after the coronavirus thrust the country into lockdown starting in March. Now, a growing number of states are pausing plans to reopen, amid rising case counts. Several are reimposing restrictions they had lifted earlier — for example, Texas, which closed bars after a spike in cases.

There were already substantial variations in how states were deciding to open up, with some forging far ahead of others. These maps show where several major sectors have reopened.

What’s Open Statewide

Retail stores
ME
MA
NH
VT
AK
RI
CT
NY
MI
WI
MN
SD
ND
MT
WA
NJ
PA
OH
IN
IL
IA
NE
WY
ID
OR
DE
DC
MD
VA
WV
MO
KS
CO
UT
NV
CA
NC
KY
TN
AR
OK
NM
AZ
SC
GA
AL
MS
LA
TX
HI
PR
FL
Restaurants
ME
MA
NH
VT
AK
RI
CT
NY
MI
WI
MN
SD
ND
MT
WA
NJ
PA
OH
IN
IL
IA
NE
WY
ID
OR
DE
DC
MD
VA
WV
MO
KS
CO
UT
NV
CA
NC
KY
TN
AR
OK
NM
AZ
SC
GA
AL
MS
LA
TX
HI
PR
FL
Hair salons and barbershops
ME
MA
NH
VT
AK
RI
CT
NY
MI
WI
MN
SD
ND
MT
WA
NJ
PA
OH
IN
IL
IA
NE
WY
ID
OR
DE
DC
MD
VA
WV
MO
KS
CO
UT
NV
CA
NC
KY
TN
AR
OK
NM
AZ
SC
GA
AL
MS
LA
TX
HI
PR
FL
Houses of worship
ME
MA
NH
VT
AK
RI
CT
NY
MI
WI
MN
SD
ND
MT
WA
NJ
PA
OH
IN
IL
IA
NE
WY
ID
OR
DE
DC
MD
VA
WV
MO
KS
CO
UT
NV
CA
NC
KY
TN
AR
OK
NM
AZ
SC
GA
AL
MS
LA
TX
HI
PR
FL
Gyms
ME
MA
NH
VT
AK
RI
CT
NY
MI
WI
MN
SD
ND
MT
WA
NJ
PA
OH
IN
IL
IA
NE
WY
ID
OR
DE
DC
MD
VA
WV
MO
KS
CO
UT
NV
CA
NC
KY
TN
AR
OK
NM
AZ
SC
GA
AL
MS
LA
TX
HI
PR
FL
Note: Local restrictions may be different. Restaurants are considered open for indoor service.

The changes — and backtracking — reflect the immense pressure on the nation’s governors to respond to a crippled economy and an anxious public, even as epidemiologists warn of a second wave of cases.

The New York Times is tracking when broad reopenings are allowed, as well as when reopening plans are paused or reversed. States may shift categories as conditions change, or to account for changes in the national landscape. Even as governors lift orders and allow reopenings, stricter local orders may remain in place.

This page will be updated regularly.

Reopened

Some states have reopened every major sector, though businesses are almost universally under restrictions, such as allowing fewer customers, requiring workers and customers to wear masks, and enforcing social distancing.

Alaska
Stay-at-home order expired on April 24.
Gov. Mike Dunleavy, a Republican, eased restrictions on several kinds of businesses starting April 24. Alaska became one of the first states to make a nearly complete reopening, with all businesses allowed to open at full capacity on May 22. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; Theaters; Bowling alleys; Museums
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Pools
Iowa
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Kim Reynolds, a Republican, ordered a number of businesses closed beginning March 17, but resisted calls to issue a stay-at-home order. Ms. Reynolds loosened restrictions in 77 of the state’s 99 counties starting May 1, and in all counties on May 15. Capacity limits on businesses were lifted June 10. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Medical spas, tanning salons; Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; Movie theaters; Museums, zoos, aquariums; Casinos; Outdoor venues; Bowling alleys, amusement parks; Indoor venues
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Gyms; Pools; Playgrounds, skating rinks, skate parks
Kansas
Stay-at-home order expired on May 3.
After reopening began May 4, Gov. Laura Kelly, a Democrat, faced backlash from Republicans in the state legislature who wanted the process to move more quickly. She vetoed a measure seeking to curb her emergency powers, and allowed reopenings at the discretion of individual counties. Ms. Kelly ordered Kansans to wear masks in public beginning July 3. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, museums and bowling alleys; Casinos; Nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Community centers, sports facilities; Pools
Industries
Offices
Kentucky
Healthy at home in effect since March 26.
Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, reopened businesses under new guidelines beginning in early May. Houses of worship, which fell under a ban on mass gatherings, were allowed to resume services after a federal judge intervened. The state has come to the end of its initial reopening timeline, though gatherings are still limited to 50 or fewer people. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Distilleries; Bars
Personal care
Pet grooming and boarding; Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Bowling alleys; Museums, aquariums, libraries, outdoor attractions; Venues and events spaces
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Aquatic centers; Campgrounds; Public pools
Industries
Manufacturing, construction, offices
Minnesota
Stay-at-home order expired on May 17.
Gov. Tim Walz, a Democrat, first allowed employees in certain agriculture, industrial and office settings to return to work starting April 27. More businesses were allowed to open at reduced capacity after his stay-at-home order expired in May. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters and concert halls; Bowling alleys, arcades and museums
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Gyms
Industries
Manufacturing; Offices
Missouri
Stay-at-home order expired on May 3.
Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, reopened all businesses — including large venues, concerts and movie theaters — on May 4, with social distancing requirements. Mr. Parson later announced that the state would lift all restrictions on June 16. Since then, Missouri has seen several record-setting single-day increases in coronavirus cases. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, music venues, etc.; Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Campgrounds
Montana
Stay-at-home order expired on April 26.
Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, allowed reopening in phases, beginning in late April. Montana is one of the few states where schools had the option to reopen this academic year, and a few schools began to reopen May 7. All businesses could reopen June 1, provided they followed certain guidelines. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars, breweries and distilleries
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, massage parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, movie theaters; Concert venues; Bowling alleys; Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Nebraska
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Pete Ricketts, a Republican, never issued a stay-at-home order, but he put in place several restrictions on businesses. Mr. Ricketts announced a plan to reopen certain businesses on a regional basis starting May 4, followed by all counties on June 1. Most of the state moved into Phase 3 of reopening in late June. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Zoos, movie theaters, libraries and venues
Outdoor and recreation
Pools; Gyms
New Hampshire
Stay-at-home order expired on June 15.
Gov. Chris Sununu, a Republican, gradually reopened sectors starting in mid-May. On June 15, he allowed his stay-at-home order to expire and reopened businesses on a rolling basis since. The final round of businesses reopened, with capacity limits and social distancing guidance, on June 29. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons, etc.; Nail salons; Tanning salons; Tattoo shops; Acupuncturists and massage therapists
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries, museums, art galleries; Bowling alleys and entertainment centers; Movie theaters; Amusement parks; Live performances
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; Outdoor attractions; Beaches; Gyms; Pools
North Dakota
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Doug Burgum, a Republican, never issued a stay-at-home order, and allowed a variety of businesses to reopen starting May 1. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars
Personal care
Salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Music and entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Sports venues
Oklahoma
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Kevin Stitt, a Republican, implemented a three-phase approach to reopening businesses starting April 24. Phase 3 began in June, when all restrictions were lifted on businesses and group gatherings provided people “consider social distancing.” Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, spas, pet groomers, etc.; Tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, sports venues, museums; Nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Zoos; Gyms
Industries
Offices
South Dakota
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Kristi Noem, a Republican, refused to issue a stay-at-home order — despite requests from local officials — and did not close businesses in the state, though she ordered them to follow C.D.C. guidelines. She invited workers and business owners frustrated by lockdowns in other states to visit South Dakota. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Wisconsin
Stay-at-home order struck down on May 13.
The state Supreme Court struck down Gov. Tony Evers's stay-at-home order on May 13, effectively lifting statewide restrictions on businesses in Wisconsin. Mr. Evers, a Democrat in a highly contested battleground state, had already announced plans for a gradual reopening but warned the ruling would cause “chaos.” Some counties have since placed their own restrictions on businesses. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Pet groomers for curbside dropoff; Hair salons, spas, barbershops
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; State parks; Gyms
Reopening

Many states are reopening in stages, allowing some sectors to open ahead of others.

District of Columbia
Stay-at-home order expired on May 29.
Washington, D.C., was under one of the nation’s strictest lockdowns until Mayor Muriel Bowser, a Democrat, began reopening on May 29, lifting a stay-at-home order before it was scheduled to expire. On June 22, she opened a second round of businesses. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants dining
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons; Nail salons, waxing salons, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, libraries
Outdoor and recreation
Dog parks, golf courses, tennis courts, parks; Gyms
Closed
Entertainment
Nightclubs
Georgia
Shelter in place expired on April 30.
Gov. Brian Kemp, a Republican, went toe-to-toe with the White House and local mayors over his decision to reopen large parts of Georgia’s economy ahead of other states, starting April 24. Mr. Kemp has continued steadily with the state’s reopening plans while case counts have trended upward. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys; Theaters, private social clubs; Large venues; Bars, nightclubs
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Hawaii
Stay-at-home order expired on May 31.
Gov. David Ige, a Democrat, started the state’s reopening process in early May, when there were only a few new cases reported each day. Each island can now set its own timeline for reopening, with the governor’s approval. Despite the slow approach, Hawaii has seen a resurgence of the virus in recent days. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Pet groomers; Nail salons in some areas; Tattoo parlors in some areas; Salons and barbershops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Arcades, bowling alleys, theaters in some areas
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches, piers, docks, etc.; State parks; Pools and waterparks in some areas; Campgrounds in some areas; Gyms
Industries
Construction in some areas; Offices in some areas
Illinois
Stay-at-home order expired on May 29.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker, a Democrat, faced political pushback for his cautious reopening strategy, but Illinois has not seen a strong upward trend in cases. On June 26, the state moved into its fourth and final stage of reopening. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Pet grooming; Hair salons, barber shops, nail salons, spas, waxing centers, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos; Theaters
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; limited fishing, boating, golf courses; Gyms
Industries
Manufacturing; Offices
Maine
Stay-at-home order expired on May 31.
Gov. Janet Mills, a Democrat, allowed some personal care businesses to begin reopening statewide May 1 and allowed additional, accelerated reopenings in counties with few coronavirus cases. More businesses were allowed to reopen statewide on June 1, but further reopenings, including of bars, have been delayed. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants; Bars open for outdoor service
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, pet groomers; Nail salons and tattoo parlors; Spas and massage parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Amusement parks, water parks; Bowling alleys and arcades; Movie theaters; Performing arts venues
Outdoor and recreation
State parks, boating, golf courses; Remote campgrounds, hunting and fishing; Private campgrounds, RV parks; Gyms
Closed
Food and drink
Bars for indoor service
Maryland
Stay-at-home order expired on May 15.
Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican who has called for an aggressive response to the virus, allowed some businesses to open with social distancing requirements starting May 15, but encouraged the adoption of more restrictive guidelines at the local level as needed. The decision to allow further reopenings in mid-June was met with criticism from a top health adviser. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Outdoor service at breweries, wineries, and distilleries; Restaurants
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Nail salons, massage parlors, tanning salons, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, outdoor shooting ranges, marinas, campgrounds; Beaches; Outdoor pools and day camps; Gyms
Industries
Manufacturing; Construction, offices
Closed
Entertainment
Theaters
Massachusetts
Stay-at-home advisory expired on May 18.
Gov. Charlie Baker, a Republican, announced a phased reopening beginning in May, with four stages scheduled to last three weeks apiece. On July 2, Mr. Baker announced that the state would progress to Phase 3 on July 6, with the exception of Boston. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Pet grooming; Nail salons, massage parlors, tanning salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Bowling alleys in most regions; Museums, aquariums in most regions; Theaters and performance venues in most regions; Movie theaters in most regions; Casinos in most regions
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; Beaches, parks, fishing, hunting and boating; Gyms in most regions
Industries
Construction, manufacturing; Offices; Hotels, lodging
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Museums and aquariums; Amusement parks, water parks and theme parks; Theaters and performance halls; Ballrooms, stadiums and convention halls
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
New Jersey
Stay-at-home order expired on June 9.
Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, was one of the last governors to lift a stay-at-home order, on June 9. New Jersey cautiously reopened businesses over the course of May and June, and rolling reopenings were set to continue into July, though Mr. Murphy indefinitely delayed plans to reopen indoor dining. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Outdoor dining at restaurants
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Nail salons, tattoo parlors, spas, massage therapy, tanning salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries for curbside pickup; Casinos; Playgrounds, water parks, amusement parks; Museums, libraries, aquariums; Bowling alleys, batting cages, shooting ranges
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses; Beaches; Campgrounds; Gyms for personal training; Pools
Industries
Construction
Closed
Food and drink
Breweries, wineries and distilleries
Entertainment
Movie theaters
New York
Stay-at-home order expired on May 28.
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, a Democrat, announced limited and phased reopenings by region starting May 15. By June 24, everywhere but New York City had entered the third stage, which allows gatherings of up to 25 people. New York City is scheduled to enter a modified third stage without the resumption of indoor dining on July 6. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Outdoor dining at restaurants in some regions; Indoor dining in some regions
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums and aquariums in some regions
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; Fishing and hunting; Public pools and playgrounds; Outdoor zoos, botanical gardens and nature parks in some regions
Industries
Construction, manufacturing; Offices; Film and TV production in some regions
Closed
Entertainment
Movie theaters, casinos; Amusement parks, bowling alleys
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Ohio
Stay-at-home order expired on May 29.
Gov. Mike DeWine, a Republican, lifted a stay-at-home order on May 1 and issued a “Stay Safe Ohio Order” that allowed businesses to reopen in phases, starting with retail stores, salons and restaurants. Entertainment venues reopened in early June. On July 2, Mr. DeWine asked seven counties to limit activities as much as possible though he did not order any closures. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, museums, art galleries; Casinos, racinos, amusement parks, water parks
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Gyms, pools, and sports leagues; Bowling alleys, miniature golf and batting cages; Aquariums, zoos; Skating rinks, playgrounds, country clubs
Industries
Manufacturing, distribution, construction; Offices
Pennsylvania
Stay-at-home order expired on June 4.
Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, took a county-by-county approach to shutting down, before issuing a statewide stay-at-home order on April 1. He is taking a similar approach to reopening, allowing counties to open in phases. By June 5, all of the state was in some phase of reopening, but wearing a mask is now required in all public places. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Shopping malls
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars in most counties; Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, spas in most counties; Hair salons, barbershops, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos, theaters, shopping malls in most counties; Casinos, theaters in all counties
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, marinas, private campgrounds; Beaches; Gyms in most counties; State parks; Public pools; Gyms
Puerto Rico
Curfew in effect since March 15 and set to expire July 22.
Gov. Wanda Vázquez, a member of the New Progressive Party, announced a curfew and closed non-essential businesses in March. Restaurants and retail stores were allowed to reopen in late May. In mid-June, Ms. Vázquez eased the lockdown and allowed most businesses to reopen, though she said she would reimpose restrictions if residents did not follow social distancing guidelines. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Restaurants
Personal care
Salons, barbershops; Pet grooming; Spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, movie theaters; Outdoor concerts and other open venues
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; Gyms
Rhode Island
Stay-at-home order expired on May 8.
Gov. Gina Raimondo, a Democrat, announced a three-phase reopening plan starting with retail stores after her stay-at-home order lifted on May 8. Rhode Island entered its second phase of reopening in June, with restaurants, gyms, salons and beaches allowed to open. The third phase was set to begin June 30, though the governor decided to limit indoor social gatherings to 25 people. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Nail salons, massage parlors, tattoo shops
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Beaches; Gyms; Casinos; Campgrounds
Industries
Offices; Malls
Tennessee
Stay-at-home order expired on April 30.
Gov. Bill Lee, a Republican, announced reopening plans for 89 of 95 Tennessee counties starting April 27. The remaining counties were to follow individual reopening plans. All counties are now in some phase of reopening, and restaurants and retail stores can operate in most counties with no restrictions. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, museums, amusement parks
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Gyms
Utah
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Gary R. Herbert, a Republican, started to reopen Utah by region on May 1. Now, just one county remains at “moderate risk,” and restaurants, gyms and salons are open everywhere. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, personal care businesses
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Pools
Vermont
Stay-at-home order expired on May 15.
Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican, allowed small changes, such as the opening of farmers’ markets, before a broader reopening beginning with retail stores on May 18. Other businesses, such as gyms and restaurants, reopened in June. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons and barbershops; Nail salons, spas, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, theaters, libraries
Outdoor and recreation
State parks, golf courses, trails, etc.; Campgrounds; Gyms, fitness centers
Industries
Manufacturing, construction, distribution
Virginia
Stay-at-home order expired on June 10.
Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat, started reopening much of the state on May 15, but kept northern Virginia, near Washington, D.C., closed until May 28. All counties moved into Phase 3 on July 1. Mr. Northam lifted capacity limits on retail stores, restaurants and bars, but kept some restrictions on indoor seating in place. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos, aquariums, outdoor concerts
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Beaches; Gyms; Pools
West Virginia
Stay-at-home order expired on May 3.
West Virginia’s stay-at-home order was in place for a little more than a month. Gov. Jim Justice, a Republican, lifted restrictions on certain businesses on May 4, with new reopenings each following week. Houses of worship were among the first allowed to reopen, and West Virginia has since registered five coronavirus outbreaks at churches. Starting July 7, face coverings will be required where social distance can’t be mantained. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, pet groomers; Tanning salons; Massage parlors and spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos; Bowling alleys, pool halls, roller rinks; Casinos; Movie theaters; Amusement parks, fairs, festivals
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms, recreation centers; State parks, campgrounds; Pools
Pausing

Several states have reopened some sectors, but paused or delayed plans to reopen further after seeing a rise in coronavirus cases.

Alabama
Stay-at-home order expired on April 30.
Gov. Kay Ivey, a Republican, ordered residents to stay home for much of April and began reopening businesses May 1. Since May 22, Alabama has been in a second stage of “Safer at Home,” with capacity limits on businesses and some gatherings. With cases rising, Ms. Ivey extended those guidelines until the end of July. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars and breweries
Personal care
Salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Entertainment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; Gyms
Arkansas
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, never implemented a statewide stay-at-home order, instead opting to close high-contact businesses like gyms and personal care services. The state began reopening many of these in early May and raised capacity limits for many sectors in mid-June. Arkansas has seen one of the steepest increases in coronavirus cases since its reopening began. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Theaters, stadiums, museums, bowling alleys; Casinos; Large venues
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Gyms; Pools
Connecticut
Stay-at-home order expired on May 20.
Connecticut was one of the last states to begin reopening, as Gov. Ned Lamont, a Democrat, allowed the state’s stay-at-home order to expire on May 20. A second phase of reopening was moved up in June after a favorable downward trend in case numbers. But Mr. Lamont postponed a third phase, which would have reopened bars and increased capacity limits for reopened businesses, in response to rising cases in neighboring states. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops; Nail salons; Tattoo parlors, spas
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos; Casinos; Movie theaters; Libraries; Amusement parks, bowling alleys
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; Gyms
Industries
Offices
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Delaware
Shelter in place expired on May 31.
Gov. John Carney, a Democrat, has overseen one of the slower reopenings, beginning June 1 with a limited number of businesses. Delaware moved into a second phase on June 15. After an increase in cases, Mr. Carney decided to delay the start of Phase 3, which was scheduled for the end of June. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Farmers markets; Restaurants; Bars in some areas
Personal care
Barber shops, hair salons, tanning salons; Nail salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, libraries, galleries, live performances; Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches; Pools; Gyms; Campgrounds
Idaho
Stay-at-home order expired on April 30.
Gov. Brad Little, a Republican, began his state’s four-stage reopening process on May 1, and has moved to a new stage almost every two weeks since. As cases surged, Mr. Little decided to postpone a full reopening that had been scheduled for June 26. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Hair salons
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Nightclubs; Large venues
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Pools and water parks
Indiana
Stay-at-home order expired on May 4.
Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, eased restrictions and allowed some reopenings for most of the state beginning May 4. On July 1, Mr. Holcomb announced that the state would pause progression to its fifth and final stage of reopening due to an increase in cases statewide and nationally. The final phase would have removed capacity limits on businesses. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars and nightclubs
Personal care
Spas, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Libraries; Museums, zoos and aquariums; Venues; Movie theaters; Bowling alleys; Conventions, fairs, parades and similar events in most counties
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Pools, tennis and basketball courts; Campgrounds; Amusement parks, water parks
Industries
Manufacturing, offices
Closed
Entertainment
Conventions, fairs, parades and similar events
Louisiana
Stay-at-home order expired on May 15.
Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, allowed the state’s stay-at-home order to lift and an array of businesses to reopen starting May 15, after facing mounting pressure to reopen from the Republican-controlled state legislature. The state moved into the second phase of its reopening plan on June 5. On June 22, citing an increase in cases, Mr. Edwards announced that the state would remain in Phase 2 for several more weeks. Read more »
Open
Retail
Malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Bars
Personal care
Salons and barbershops; Spas, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Certain museums, zoos and aquariums; Casinos; Event centers
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; State parks; Pools; Bowling alleys, skating rinks
Closed
Outdoor and recreation
Amusement parks, water parks and theme parks; Concert and music halls
Mississippi
Shelter in place expired on April 27.
Gov. Tate Reeves, a Republican, let the state’s stay-at-home order expire April 27, and reopened retail stores, with some limits. All businesses were allowed to open June 1. The state reported its highest daily increase in cases one week later. On July 1, Mr. Reeves announced that the state would pause a full reopening. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining, bars
Personal care
Salons and barbershops; Tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos; Movie theaters; Libraries, museums
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Gyms
Nevada
Stay-at-home order expired on May 9.
Gov. Steve Sisolak, a Democrat, kept pace with other states and reopened many businesses starting May 9. Nevada moved into a broader reopening later in May, and casinos and gaming were allowed to resume operations on June 4. In response to a recent spike in cases, Mr. Sisolak has tabled plans for Phase 3 and is now requiring Nevadans to wear face masks. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Restaurants; Bars
Personal care
Barbershops, hair salons and nail salons; Massage therapy; Tattoo and piercing shops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, art galleries, zoos and aquariums; Movie theaters, bowling alleys; Gaming
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, pickleball, tennis courts; State parks; Gyms; Pools and water parks
New Mexico
Stay-at-home order expired on May 31.
Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, a Democrat, extended New Mexico’s stay-at-home order through the end of May but allowed some sectors to reopen at limited capacities beginning May 16. Three northwestern counties with the most severe outbreaks were shut down until June 1. The next phase of reopenings is delayed indefinitely. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores; Malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining; Breweries
Personal care
Pet grooming and boarding, veterinary services; Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Golf courses, boating; Gyms, pools
Industries
Offices
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Entertainment
Casinos; Theaters
North Carolina
Stay-at-home order expired on May 22.
Gov. Roy Cooper, a Democrat, allowed a variety of businesses to reopen in May. In late June, with cases counts trending upward, Mr. Cooper paused North Carolina’s reopening plan and required residents to wear face coverings in public. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Outdoor and recreation
Pools
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Entertainment
Movie theaters; Bowling alleys
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Oregon
Stay-at-home order in effect since March 23.
Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, started a three-phase regional reopening on May 15. All but four counties have now entered the second phase, but Ms. Brown said Phase 3 would not come until September at the earliest. Eigh counties are on a watch list and could see businesses close if cases increase. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurants and bars
Personal care
Salons, barbershops
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, bowling alleys in most counties
Outdoor and recreation
Some state parks; Pools in most counties; Gyms
Industries
Offices in most counties
South Carolina
Stay-at-home order expired on May 4.
Gov. Henry McMaster, a Republican, was among the last to issue a stay-at-home order and among the first to begin opening up his state, starting April 20. The reopening began with retail stores and continued in the following weeks with restaurants, gyms and pools. Tourist attractions reopened in time for Memorial Day weekend. But with cases rising, Mr. McMaster said he wouldn’t allow movie theaters, concerts, race tracks or nightclubs to open. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, zoos, aquariums
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches, piers, docks, etc.; Gyms; Pools
Washington
Stay-at-home order expired on May 31.
Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, said he would not hesitate to pause reopenings or close businesses if needed. While every county has now moved into some phase of reopening, Washington said it would pause before moving any counties into Phase 4 and keep restrictions in place through July 9. Mr. Inslee also ordered businesses to require employees and customers to wear face masks. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores in most counties; Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining in most counties
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc. in most counties; Pet grooming in most counties; Gyms in most counties; Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.; Pet grooming
Houses of worship
Religious services in most counties
Entertainment
Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
State parks, fishing, hunting, golf courses
Industries
Construction
Wyoming
Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order.
Gov. Mark Gordon, a Republican, did not order Wyoming residents to stay home, and he began lifting restrictions on businesses May 1. However, Mr. Gordon recently extended restrictions on restaurants, bars and gyms until at least July 15. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, entertaiment venues
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; State parks
Reversing

Some states have moved to close certain sectors statewide or in certain counties after seeing a surge in cases.

Arizona
Stay-at-home order expired on May 15.
Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, began gradually reopening businesses in early May. After his stay-at-home order expired May 15, Arizona saw cases soar. In response, on June 29, Mr. Ducey announced that the state would “pause” operations of bars, gyms, movie theaters, waterparks and tubing rentals for one month to contain the virus’s spread. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Barbershops, salons, etc.
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos
Outdoor and recreation
Pools, spas
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Entertainment
Movie theaters
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms; Waterparks
California
Stay-at-home order in effect since March 19.
Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, has emphasized caution and allowed counties to reopen sectors only as they meet certain criteria for testing and transmission rates. Many California counties reopened businesses such as restaurants and personal care services in May. In response to rising case counts in recent weeks, the state has created a “watch list” of counties where bars, indoor dining and other indoor activities must close until the virus’s spread is controlled. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail
Food and drink
Restaurant dining in some counties; Bars in some counties
Personal care
Pet groomers; Hair salons and barbershops in some counties; Nail salons, cosmetology services, tattoo parlors, piercing shops in some counties
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Casinos in some counties; Museums, galleries, zoos, aquariums in some counties; Bowling alleys, arcades, mini golf, theaters in some counties
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms in some counties
Industries
Manufacturing; Warehouses; Offices; Movie, TV and music production
Colorado
Stay-at-home order expired on April 26.
Gov. Jared Polis was one of the first Democratic governors to begin reopening his state, letting Colorado's stay-at-home order expire on April 26. Businesses reopened throughout May and June, but in response to continuing outbreaks in neighboring states, on July 1, Mr. Polis extended the state’s Safer at Home phase and closed bars. Counties and communities that meet certain criteria could reopen bars or move further along in reopening later this month. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons and personal services
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Museums, indoor events; Fairs, rodeos, concerts, outdoor events; Libraries
Outdoor and recreation
Campgrounds; Pools, playgrounds; Gyms
Industries
Offices; Manufacturing
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Entertainment
Casinos
Florida
Stay-at-home order expired on May 4.
Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, gradually opened businesses in May, starting in Florida’s less populous counties. In early June, he moved forward with reopening bars and larger entertainment venues in some counties, even as case counts rose. On June 26, he moved to effectively shutter bars again after a spike in cases. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons; Tattoo parlors, massage therapy, tanning salons, acupuncture in most counties
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Sporting venues without spectators; Museums, libraries; Movie theaters, concert halls, bowling alleys in most counties
Outdoor and recreation
Beaches, trails; Gyms
Closed
Food and drink
Bars
Michigan
Stay-at-home order expired on June 1.
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat, took a regional approach to reopening, allowing some sectors to open in some areas before lifting a statewide stay-at-home order on June 1. Some businesses were allowed to reopen statewide beginning June 8. Ms. Whitmer has since paused further statewide reopenings, and on July 1, she ordered bars throughout most of the state to close again for indoor service. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores
Food and drink
Bars for indoor service in certain counties; Restaurant dining; Bars for outdoor service
Personal care
Pet groomers; Hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, tattoo parlors
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Arcades, bowling alleys, theaters, night clubs and convention centers in some regions
Outdoor and recreation
Golf courses, marinas; Pools; Gyms in some regions
Industries
Construction, real estate; Manufacturing, including auto companies; Offices
Closed
Food and drink
Bars for indoor service in certain counties
Outdoor and recreation
Gyms
Texas
Stay-at-home order expired on April 30.
Gov. Greg Abbott allowed his stay-at-home order to lapse on April 30, a move that gave Texas, the nation’s second-largest state, one of the shortest such orders in the country. A surge in cases in late June caused Mr. Abbott to order bars to close and restaurants to reduce capacity, among the first reopening reversals in the country. Starting July 3, he once again encouraged Texans to stay home and required face covering in public places in counties with more than 20 positive cases. Read more »
Open
Retail
Retail stores, malls
Food and drink
Restaurant dining
Personal care
Salons, barbershops, etc.; Massage services
Houses of worship
Entertainment
Movie theaters, museums, libraries; Bowling alleys, bingo halls, skating rinks, rodeos; Aquariums; Amusement parks; Carnivals
Outdoor and recreation
State parks; Pools; Gyms; Water parks; Zoos
Industries
Offices, manufacturing
Closed
Food and drink
Bars

Tracking the Coronavirus