France Covid Map and Case Count

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50,000 cases
Feb.
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New cases
7-day average
Total reported On Nov. 29 14-day change
Cases 2.2 million 9,784 –60%
Deaths 52,325 198 –13%

14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

There have been at least 2,218,400 confirmed cases of coronavirus in France, according to the French government. As of Monday morning, 52,325 people had died.

National health authorities in France do not provide cumulative regional data for test-confirmed cases of the virus; only daily snapshots are reported. They do, however, report regional data for the total number of people hospitalized for Covid-19 and how many of those people have recovered or died.

Hospitalizations in France

Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Source: Public Health France. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have been hospitalized with the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

Here’s how the number of hospitalizations and deaths are growing in France:

The table below was recently changed to show the average number of cases per day in the last seven days instead of the total number of cases over the last seven days.

Hospitalizations and deaths by province

This table is sorted by places with the most new hospitalizations per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Select deaths or a different column header to sort by different data.

Hosp. Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
new in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
+ Bourgogne-Franche-Comté 10,990 384 1,899 66 87.4 3.1 25.9 0.9
+ Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes 33,064 405 5,163 63 248.4 3 78.4 1
+ Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur 20,983 415 2,747 54 129.4 2.6 32.9 0.7
+ Grand Est 25,030 446 4,747 84 141.7 2.5 35.6 0.6
+ Hauts-de-France 20,670 341 3,480 57 133.9 2.2 33.4 0.6
+ Île-de-France 65,311 532 10,828 88 222.4 1.8 52.6 0.4
+ Centre-Val de Loire 6,267 240 1,008 39 41.9 1.6 13.1 0.5
+ Normandie 6,917 206 1,135 34 53.1 1.6 15.7 0.5
+ Pays de la Loire 6,811 176 987 26 53.1 1.4 13.7 0.4
Guyane 1,948 706 66 24 3.7 1.3

After a summer lull, France has entered a new nationwide lockdown to face a frightening second wave. New cases started to jump in late August and are now soaring. Hospitals are once again under intense pressure, with many postponing non-emergency services to make room for Covid-19 patients.

The situation is also much more difficult than it was in the spring. Many non-Covid patients can no longer delay procedures, and hospital workers say they have barely recovered from the exhaustion of the first wave. The second wave is also hitting most of France at the same time, making it harder to move patients to neighboring regions, as was done in March and April.

The new lockdown is slightly looser than in the spring. Movement outside one’s home is still strictly limited, public gatherings are banned, and establishments like restaurants, bars or cinemas are once again closed. But parks and schools are still open, restrictions on retirement home visits are not as tight, and a wider range of businesses are allowed to remain open. In most French cities, mask-wearing was made mandatory in enclosed public spaces and outdoor areas in August.

The French government invested heavily in ramping up its ability to identify and isolate new cases, but authorities are still facing major hurdles. Tests were backlogged, and contact-tracing efforts have stumbled. Barely three percent of French people have downloaded a smartphone application intended to aid contact tracing.

How Cases Are Growing

Here’s how the number of new cases and deaths are changing over time:

New reported cases by day in France

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20,000
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New cases
7-day average
These are days with a data reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day in France

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Feb.
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Aug.
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Oct.
Nov.
New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a data reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Generally speaking, France was late to increase its testing capacities compared to countries like Germany. Now, testing is widespread and massively available, but authorities have acknowledged that the reported number of test-confirmed cases was probably lower than the real number of cases.

Where You Can Find More Information

Read more about the virus’s impact on France’s economy — from its job market to its sacred wine industry — and on its vaunted health system. The epidemic has put a strain on poor urban suburbs and intruded on a cherished summer ritual for French-Algerian families. It also disrupted - but did not stop - two of France’s most widely-watched sporting events: the French Open and the Tour de France.

Faced with a resurgence of the epidemic, authorities are now calling on people to learn to live with the virus. In Paris, cycling is becoming the new normal because of the risks of infection in public transport.

Here is where you can find more detailed information:

France has centralized official coronavirus-related information and documents — like the waivers needed for personal outings — on this website (a more limited version is available in English). The government also releases daily statistics on the outbreak here. Key numbers and more detailed breakdowns are also available via the national public health authority.

The foreign ministry has an English guide for foreign visitors to France and instructions on the newly-required travel certificates.

Follow these local media organizations for more information: Le Monde, Franceinfo, Le Figaro, Libération and Mediapart. In English, check out The Local.

About the data

The Times has identified the following reporting anomalies or methodology changes in the data:

France does not regularly report new data on weekends.

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.