Germany Coronavirus Map and Case Count

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New cases
7-day average
Total reported On Feb. 24 14-day change
Cases 2.4 million 11,869 –7%
Deaths 69,125 385 –38%

14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

There have been at least 2,414,600 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Germany, according to the Robert Koch Institute, the country’s public health institution. As of Thursday morning, 69,125 people had died.

Reported cases in Germany

Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Source: Geschäftsbereich des Bundesministeriums für Gesundheit (Federal Ministry of Health) of Germany. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.
About this data For total cases and deaths: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by region. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

Here’s how the number of cases and deaths are growing in Germany:

The table below was recently changed to show the average number of cases per day in the last seven days instead of the total number of cases over the last seven days.

Reported cases and deaths by state

This table is sorted by places with the most cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Select deaths or a different column header to sort by different data.

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
Thuringia 74,886 3,494 2,810 131 388 18 18.3 0.85
Saxony-Anhalt 59,480 2,693 2,358 107 286 13 19.6 0.89
Saxony 192,399 4,718 7,574 186 492 12 40.0 0.98
Bremen 17,705 2,592 329 48 76 11 1.7 0.25
Hamburg 50,919 2,766 1,251 68 195 11 6.4 0.35
Lower Saxony 161,643 2,025 4,230 53 829 10 36.1 0.45
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania 23,938 1,487 719 45 159 10 7.9 0.49
Saarland 28,525 2,880 857 87 96 10 3.1 0.32
North Rhine-Westphalia 526,695 2,937 12,875 72 1,678 9 64.4 0.36
Brandenburg 75,649 3,012 2,957 118 226 9 11.9 0.47

Germany has twice prolonged its second full lockdown, entered on Dec. 16, amid fears the variant that has spread rapidly through England will take hold in the country. Chancellor Angela Merkel and regional leaders decided that bars, restaurants, theaters and gyms would remain closed until at least March 7.

Schools will be allowed to open based on the needs of each of the country’s 16 states, with smaller classes, distancing and masks. Hairdressers will also be allowed to open earlier, provided they follow guidelines, including the wearing of hospital-grade masks, also required on all public transport.

The decision was a tough sell as Germany has seen infections drop in recent weeks, although more than 50,000 people have died. “We want to do everything in our power so that we don’t end up riding an up-and-down wave of openings and closures,” Ms. Merkel said on Feb. 10.

The government began offering businesses affected by the shut-down a third round of compensation, after provisions for November and December worth 75 percent of their earnings from the same months in 2019, part of a $12-billion financial aid package to help sustain the economy. While theater and musical performances have been able to move online during lockdown, many service providers, such as those involved in the country’s $33-billion trade-fair industry, are struggling even with government support.

How Cases Are Growing

Here’s how the number of new cases and deaths are changing over time:

New reported cases by day

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New cases
7-day average
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day

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New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

The data in Germany is compiled by the country’s public health institution, which collects information reported by doctors and laboratories to the local health authorities in each state. Other organizations have reported higher figures for cases and deaths in Germany, but the German health authorities maintain that this data is unverified.

About the data

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.