Spain Coronavirus Map and Case Count

0
20,000
40,000
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80,000 cases
Feb. 2020
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Jan. 2021
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New cases
7-day average
Total reported On April 11 14-day change
Cases 3.3 million 0 +8%
Deaths 76,328 0 –70%

14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

There have been at least 3,347,500 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Spain, according to the Spanish Ministry of Health. As of Monday morning, 76,328 people had died.

Reported cases in Spain

Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Source: Ministerio de Sanidad (Ministry of Health) of Spain
About this data For total cases and deaths: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by region. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

Here’s how the number of cases are growing in Spain:

Reported cases and deaths by region

This table is sorted by places with the most cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Select deaths or a different column header to sort by different data.

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
Navarra 56,129 8,602 1,126 173 185 28 0.6 0.09
Madrid 640,656 9,583 14,705 220 1,654 25 18.0 0.27
País Vasco 168,334 7,715 4,020 184 532 24 10.6 0.48
Andalucía 518,285 6,136 9,347 111 1,444 17 19.0 0.22
Aragón 112,848 8,521 3,375 255 216 16 3.4 0.26
Cataluña 547,239 7,192 13,568 178 1,123 15 12.0 0.16
Castilla y León 215,845 8,983 6,673 278 339 14 5.7 0.24
La Rioja 28,340 9,012 751 239 42 13 0.9 0.27
Castilla La Mancha 178,092 8,737 5,778 283 249 12 2.9 0.14
Asturias 48,329 4,738 1,918 188 100 10 2.6 0.25

How Cases Are Growing

Here’s how the number of new cases and deaths are changing over time:

New reported cases by day

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Jan. 2021
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New cases
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day

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1,500 deaths
Feb. 2020
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Jan. 2021
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Many deaths from unspecified days
New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Spanish authorities have changed their data collection method several times since the beginning of the pandemic, creating confusion over the actual number of confirmed cases in the country.

Where You Can Find More Information

Read more about the second wave of infections, and how diverging views among authorities on how to impose new restrictions in Madrid have ended up in the courtroom.

In the spring, the coronavirus pandemic overwhelmed nursing homes, and led some health workers to call themselves “health care kamikazes,” as they were forced to make their own equipment.

Spanish health authorities publish daily data at midday on Twitter, Telegram, and on the health ministry’s website.

Most news organizations have their own live coverage dedicated to the coronavirus outbreak: El País, El Mundo, El Diario.es, La Vanguardia.

For a clear explanation (in Spanish) on Spain’s sometimes confusing way of counting cases and deaths, El Diario has a useful article.

About the data

The Times has identified the following reporting anomalies or methodology changes in the data:

June 19, 2020: Spain reported many deaths that were not properly recorded from earlier in the pandemic.

Spain does not regularly report new data on weekends.

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.