Spain Covid Map and Case Count

0
20,000 cases
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
New cases
7-day average
Total reported On Oct. 21 14-day change
Cases 1.0 million 16,973 +46%
Deaths 34,366 156 +24%

Includes confirmed and probable cases where available. 14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

There have been at least 1,005,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Spain, according to the Spanish Ministry of Health. As of Thursday morning, 34,366 people had died.

Reported cases in Spain

Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Source: Ministerio de Sanidad (Ministry of Health) of Spain
About this data For total cases and deaths: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by region. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

Here’s how the number of cases are growing in Spain:

Reported cases and deaths by region

This table is sorted by places with the most cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Select deaths or a different column header to sort by different data.

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Cases
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Deaths
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
Navarra 26,845 4,114 664 102 3,586 550 37 5.7
La Rioja 10,876 3,458 440 140 1,025 326 6 1.9
Castilla y León 66,583 2,771 3,400 141 7,772 323 120 5.0
Aragón 45,479 3,434 1,543 117 4,181 316 48 3.6
Cataluña 183,747 2,415 5,927 78 20,473 269 37 0.5
Madrid 286,527 4,286 10,123 151 15,782 236 286 4.3
Murcia 28,070 1,878 274 18 3,388 227 21 1.4
Castilla La Mancha 55,358 2,716 3,333 164 4,578 225 56 2.7
Andalucía 99,593 1,179 2,182 26 17,820 211 129 1.5
País Vasco 54,904 2,516 2,027 93 4,412 202 54 2.5

The number of new cases has soared in Spain in recent weeks, and authorities have warned that a new nationwide lockdown could be imposed if the trend continues.

Spain lifted a state of emergency in late June as the country, one of the hardest-hit in Europe, emerged from a three-month nationwide lockdown that only allowed people outside to walk their dogs or shop for groceries. In July, shops, beaches, bars and restaurants all reopened, and the country began to welcome tourists again too.

The return of nightlife and group activities — far faster than most European neighbors — has contributed to the epidemic’s resurgence.

The majority of Spain’s regional authorities have reimposed requirements to wear face coverings at all times outdoors. In Catalonia, the regional government also urged its nearly three million residents to stay indoors as the area reported a surge of new cases.

The coronavirus outbreak has severely damaged Spain's image as one of the healthiest nations in the world. It has long boasted a robust universal health care system and the highest life expectancy in the European Union. The pandemic also infected thousands of the country’s health workers.

How Cases Are Growing

Here’s how the number of new cases and deaths are changing over time:

New reported cases by day in Spain

0
10,000
20,000
30,000 cases
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
New cases
7-day average
These are days with a data reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day in Spain

0
500
1,000 deaths
Feb.
March
April
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Many deaths from unspecified days
New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a data reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Spanish authorities have changed their data collection method several times since March, creating confusion over the actual number of confirmed cases in the country. In April, the health ministry started to include results from antibody tests in its daily tallies of confirmed cases, only to retract them a week later. Antibody tests, authorities said, don’t reflect new infections, because they “do not determine whether the person developed the disease, how long it has been since he or she has developed immunity.”

Since late April, the tally of confirmed cases includes data obtained from PCR diagnostic tests only, which caused a drop in the number of known infections, from around 220,000 to just over 200,000. In late May, Spain announced yet another way of collecting data, by counting a death based on when it occurred instead of when authorities were notified. As a result, the country’s death toll saw a drop of around 2,000 deaths.

Confused? Many people and news outlets have been too. Although authorities have argued that the new data collection system provides a better picture of the pandemic, Spanish news media have reported “incomprehensible figures” and the “thousands of casualties that suddenly disappeared from the series.”

Spain, like most countries, is only counting fatalities of those who have tested positive for coronavirus. The Madrid region and Catalonia, the country’s worst hit areas, have reported “confirmed or suspected” coronavirus deaths provided by funeral homes in daily updates, but those updated numbers are not included in the daily death tolls published by Spain’s health ministry. The regional numbers there include deaths in nursing homes and suggest that the death toll is far higher than reported so far.

Where You Can Find More Information

Read more about Spain’s overwhelmed nursing homes, and watch how unprotected health workers, who have called themselves “health care kamikazes,” have made their own equipment. Police officers have played guitar in the streets daily, and Spaniards organized elaborate Good Friday celebrations from their balconies.

As Spain eases its lockdown, read more about its strained courts, an engineer wandering alone in an empty luxury hotel of Barcelona and how a price drop for Spanish prawns has turned a fine delicacy into daily fare.

Spanish health authorities publish daily data at midday on Twitter, Telegram, and on the health ministry’s website.

Most news organizations have their own live coverage dedicated to the coronavirus outbreak: El País, El Mundo, El Diario.es, La Vanguardia.

For a clear explanation (in Spanish) on Spain’s sometimes confusing way of counting cases and deaths, El Diario has a useful article.

About the data

The Times has identified the following reporting anomalies or methodology changes in the data:

June 19: Spain reported many deaths that were not properly recorded from earlier in the pandemic.

Spain does not regularly report new data on weekends.

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.