New York City Coronavirus Map and Case Count

As of May 25, 2021, this page is no longer being updated with the latest data. Please visit the updated New York City page or view data for New York State.

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Mar. 2020
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New cases
7-day average
Total reported On May 25 14-day change
Cases 947,310 466 –47%
Deaths 33,156 10 –52%

Day with reporting anomaly.

Case counts come from both state and city sources and may not match the city's figures; 14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

At least 10 new coronavirus deaths and 466 new cases were reported in New York City on May 25. Over the past week, there has been an average of 481 cases per day, a decrease of 47 percent from the average two weeks earlier.

Cases in New York City

Average daily cases per 100,000 people in past week
Few or no cases
Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
Share of population that has died
No deaths reported
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Source: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
About this data Note: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by ZIP code. For total cases: Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive for the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

As of Tuesday evening, there have been at least 947,310 cases and 33,156 deaths in New York City since the beginning of the pandemic, according to a New York Times database.

Cases by ZIP code

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
11697, Queens Breezy Point 568 16,060 12 339 1 28
11691, Queens Edgemere, Bayswater and Far Rockaway 7,592 11,723 457 706 18 28 0.2 0.26
10471, Bronx Riverdale and Fieldston 1,980 9,319 119 560 3 15
11432, Queens Jamaica Hills and Jamaica Estates 6,061 9,591 319 505 8 13
11212, Brooklyn Brownsville 7,619 9,573 346 435 9 12 0.6 0.72
11416, Queens Ozone Park 3,100 11,648 98 368 3 11 0.1 0.54
11419, Queens Richmond Hill and South Ozone Park 5,879 11,562 168 330 5 11
10304, Staten Island Todt Hill, Fox Hills and Stapleton 5,574 13,131 261 615 4 10 0.3 0.67
11375, Queens Forest Hills 5,608 7,949 271 384 7 10
11414, Queens Howard Beach 3,023 10,695 111 393 3 10
About this data Sources: New York City Department of City Planning, Zillow and U.S. Census (neighborhood names). 2019 population estimates are from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and are based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the New York City Department of City Planning.

Many of the neighborhoods with the highest number of cases per capita were areas with the lowest median incomes and largest average household size. The biggest hot spots included communities in the South Bronx, north and southeast Queens, and much of Staten Island.

Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island

The outbreak is worse in areas with lower incomes …

1 in 20
1 in 10
1 in 7 people
had a case
$0
$100,000
$200,000
Higher median income →

… and more people living together.

1 in 20
1 in 10
1 in 7 people
had a case
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More people per household →

While age was a major factor in who died from Covid-19, neighborhoods with high concentrations of black and Latino people, as well as low-income residents, suffered the highest death rates. In August, the city released the results of 1.5 million antibody tests, which showed that in one ZIP code in Queens, more than 50 percent of people who had gotten tested were found to have antibodies, a strikingly high rate.

The New York Times is engaged in a comprehensive effort to track details about every reported case in the United States, collecting information from federal, state and local officials around the clock. The numbers in this article are being updated several times a day based on the latest information our journalists are gathering from around the country.

Follow our coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.

New reported cases by day

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New cases
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day

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Counting method changed for deaths
New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

About the data

In data for New York City, the Times relies on reports from both city and state health departments. The figures here may not match health department statistics. New York City typically releases new data each day. Weekend counts may be lower because fewer sources report to the state. Cases and deaths are reported based on a person’s permanent or usual residence.

The Times has identified the following reporting anomalies or methodology changes in the data:

March 18, 2021: New York City had a multiday disruption in reporting new data.

Dec. 7, 2020: The New York City health department began reporting probable cases. It also revised how it assigns cases to zip codes throughout the city.

Aug. 20, 2020: New York City removed four previously reported deaths after reviewing records.

Aug. 6, 2020: Our database changed to record deaths of New York City residents instead of deaths that took place in New York City.

June 30, 2020: New York City added a backlog of deaths from unspecified dates.

April 19, 2020: New York State added a backlog of confirmed deaths from April 17 and April 18.

April 6, 2020: The Times began using deaths reported by the New York State Department of Health instead of the city's health department.

The tallies on this page include probable and confirmed cases and deaths.

Confirmed cases and deaths, which are widely considered to be an undercount of the true toll, are counts of individuals whose coronavirus infections were confirmed by a molecular laboratory test. Probable cases and deaths count individuals who meet criteria for other types of testing, symptoms and exposure, as developed by national and local governments.

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.