Italy Coronavirus Map and Case Count

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10,000
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Feb. 2020
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New cases
7-day average
Total reported On May 11 14-day change
Cases 4.1 million 6,943 –30%
Deaths 123,282 251 –32%

Day with reporting anomaly.

14-day change trends use 7-day averages.

There have been at least 4,123,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Italy, according to the Italian Department of Civil Protection. As of Wednesday morning, 123,282 people had died.

Reported cases in Italy

Share of population with a reported case
No cases reported
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Source: Italian Department of Civil Protection. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.
About this data For total cases and deaths: The map shows the known locations of coronavirus cases by region. Circles are sized by the number of people there who have tested positive or have a probable case of the virus, which may differ from where they contracted the illness.

Here’s how the number of new known cases and deaths are growing across Italy’s provinces.

Reported cases and deaths by region and province

This table is sorted by places with the most cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days. Select deaths or a different column header to sort by different data.

Total
cases
Per 100,000 Total
deaths
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000 Daily avg.
in last
7 days
Per 100,000
+ Campania 406,416 7,005 6,719 116 1,290 22 33.6 0.58
Valle d'Aosta 11,259 8,959 464 369 28 22 0.7 0.57
+ Puglia 243,618 6,047 6,152 153 782 19 22.0 0.55
+ Basilicata 25,089 4,457 555 99 108 19 1.9 0.33
+ Tuscany 234,097 6,277 6,423 172 651 17 21.4 0.57
+ Piedmont 352,860 8,100 11,433 262 700 16 14.7 0.34
+ Calabria 63,355 3,254 1,092 56 304 16 7.4 0.38
+ Sicily 217,310 4,346 5,592 112 774 15 17.7 0.35
+ Emilia-Romagna 376,939 8,453 13,031 292 668 15 13.0 0.29
+ Marche 99,945 6,553 2,973 195 227 15 3.1 0.21

How Cases Are Changing

Here’s how the number of new cases and deaths are changing over time:

New reported cases by day

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New cases
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: The seven-day average is the average of a day and the previous six days of data.

New reported deaths by day

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Feb. 2020
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Jan. 2021
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New deaths
7-day average
These are days with a reporting anomaly. Read more here.
Note: Scale for deaths chart is adjusted from cases chart to display trend.

The New York Times has found that official tallies in the United States and in more than a dozen other countries have undercounted deaths during the coronavirus outbreak because of limited testing availability.

Daily data at the regional and provincial level is provided by the Italian Department of Civil Protection in Italian and English. The data includes the number of confirmed cases, deaths, recoveries, hospitalized patients and the number of people in intensive care. The data on the number of “swabs” undertaken each day reflects the number of tests performed, and the Civil Protection has recently started providing the number of people tested as well.

The head of Italy’s Civil Protection agency estimated that the number of cases could be as much as ten times higher than the current figure. A study by Italy’s national statistics agency strongly suggests that many more Italians may have died from the coronavirus than the official numbers indicate.

Where You Can Find More Information

Read more about the toll the virus has taken on Italian families, the healthcare system, the poorer south, and some particularly vulnerable populations such as priests and nuns, supermarket clerks and the homeless. Italy, the unfortunate vanguard of Western democracies grappling with the virus, is now weighing different options on how to reopen the country, and having the right antibodies might play a role in determining who gets to work and who does not.

And as the country gets ready for a partial reopening on May 4, in the hardest-hit areas, Italians are looking to hold someone accountable.

Here is where you can find more detailed information in Italian:

Updated control measures, and common questions about them.

A list of travel restrictions from the Foreign Ministry.

How to protect yourself, and updates on the outbreak, from the Department of Civil Protection, the Istituto Superiore di Sanità and the Health Ministry.

Il Sole 24 Ore has an analysis of infection trends.

Corriere della Sera, La Stampa and la Repubblica are Italy’s principal newspapers, though they require a subscription.

About the data

Governments often revise data or report a single-day large increase in cases or deaths from unspecified days without historical revisions, which can cause an irregular pattern in the daily reported figures. The Times is excluding these anomalies from seven-day averages when possible.