Who Can Get the Vaccine in Your State?

The United States has cleared an important milestone in its vaccine rollout: All people 16 and older are now eligible for the coronavirus vaccine in every state. Universal eligibility follows months where states relied on complicated phase-based plans that prioritized certain vulnerable individuals — like older Americans, critical workers and those with certain medical conditions. Often, county plans differed from state plans.

Health care workers and residents of long-term care facilities have been eligible for vaccination in every state for months, and people 65 and older have been eligible for months in most states.

For now, the vaccines are not approved for children 15 and younger, but Pfizer recently requested that the Food and Drug Administration expand the emergency use authorization for its vaccine to permit use in children 12 and older. If that happens, young adolescents could potentially start getting vaccinated before school starts in the fall of 2021.

Who is eligible for vaccines, by age

Every state has started vaccinating all adults.

16+

Data as recent as April 19.

Sources: State and county health departments.

The tables below, which have been updated every weekday, show who is eligible for vaccination in each state, in addition to health care workers and long-term care residents.

Eligibility by age or health status

All states are vaccinating all adults. Click on a state for more information.

Eligible only in some counties

Location Age High-risk adults Universal adult eligibility date
AlabamaAla. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

AlaskaAlaska ›

16+

Yes

March 9

ArizonaAriz. ›

16+

Yes

March 24

ArkansasArk. ›

16+

Yes

March 30

CaliforniaCalif. ›

16+

Yes

April 15

ColoradoColo. ›

16+

Yes

April 2

ConnecticutConn. ›

16+

Yes

April 1

DelawareDel. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

FloridaFla. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

GeorgiaGa. ›

16+

Yes

March 25

HawaiiHawaii ›

16+

Yes

April 19

IdahoIdaho ›

16+

Yes

April 5

IllinoisIll. ›

16+

Yes

April 12

IndianaInd. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

IowaIowa ›

16+

Yes

April 5

KansasKan. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

KentuckyKy. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

LouisianaLa. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

MaineMaine ›

16+

Yes

April 7

MarylandMd. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

MassachusettsMass. ›

16+

Yes

April 19

MichiganMich. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

MinnesotaMinn. ›

16+

Yes

March 30

MississippiMiss. ›

16+

Yes

March 16

MissouriMo. ›

16+

Yes

April 9

MontanaMont. ›

16+

Yes

April 1

NebraskaNeb. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

NevadaNev. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

New HampshireN.H. ›

16+

Yes

April 2

New JerseyN.J. ›

16+

Yes

April 19

New MexicoN.M. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

New YorkN.Y. ›

16+

Yes

April 6

North CarolinaN.C. ›

16+

Yes

April 7

North DakotaN.D. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OhioOhio ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OklahomaOkla. ›

16+

Yes

March 29

OregonOre. ›

16+

Yes

April 19

PennsylvaniaPa. ›

16+

Yes

April 13

Rhode IslandR.I. ›

16+

Yes

April 19

South CarolinaS.C. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

South DakotaS.D. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

TennesseeTenn. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

TexasTexas ›

16+

Yes

March 29

UtahUtah ›

16+

Yes

March 24

VermontVt. ›

16+

Yes

April 19

VirginiaVa. ›

16+

Yes

April 18

WashingtonWash. ›

16+

Yes

April 15

Washington, D.C.D.C. ›

16+

Yes

April 12

West VirginiaW.Va. ›

16+

Yes

March 22

WisconsinWis. ›

16+

Yes

April 5

WyomingWyo. ›

16+

Yes

March 31

Data as recent as April 19.

Sources: State and county health departments.

The Times has tracked statewide eligibility based on age, occupation and underlying health conditions. The Times also recorded the date when vaccines became available to all adults in a state.

When all adults became eligible for the vaccine in each state

Before April

April 1 through April 14

April 15 or later

Data as recent as April 19.

Sources: State and county health departments.

In many instances, people may be eligible for a vaccine but unable to make an appointment or access vaccination sites. And some counties or cities may delay or pause eligibility for certain groups even after a state expands access.

Eligibility by occupation

Click on a state for more information.

Eligible only in some counties

Location Grocery workers Food-processing workers Postal workers Restaurant workers Clergy
AlabamaAla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

AlaskaAlaska ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ArizonaAriz. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ArkansasArk. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

CaliforniaCalif. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ColoradoColo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

ConnecticutConn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

DelawareDel. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

FloridaFla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

GeorgiaGa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

HawaiiHawaii ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IdahoIdaho ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IllinoisIll. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IndianaInd. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

IowaIowa ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

KansasKan. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

KentuckyKy. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

LouisianaLa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MaineMaine ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MarylandMd. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MassachusettsMass. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MichiganMich. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MinnesotaMinn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MississippiMiss. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MissouriMo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MontanaMont. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NebraskaNeb. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

NevadaNev. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New HampshireN.H. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New JerseyN.J. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New MexicoN.M. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

New YorkN.Y. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

North CarolinaN.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

North DakotaN.D. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OhioOhio ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OklahomaOkla. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

OregonOre. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

PennsylvaniaPa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Rhode IslandR.I. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

South CarolinaS.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

South DakotaS.D. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TennesseeTenn. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

TexasTexas ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

UtahUtah ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

VermontVt. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

VirginiaVa. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WashingtonWash. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Washington, D.C.D.C. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

West VirginiaW.Va. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WisconsinWis. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

WyomingWyo. ›

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Data as recent as April 19.

Sources: State and county health departments. | Note: Some state or local governments have imposed additional restrictions on eligibility for certain groups of workers.

The next phase of the rollout will come with new challenges. Some experts believe that making more people eligible will ultimately get more people across the country vaccinated more quickly. But others have said they are worried that some people may have trouble competing for a shot as the eligibility flood gates open.

There are many reasons eligible people may not be vaccinated, including, in some areas, lingering issues of short supply, limited access to vaccination sites and confusing procedures for booking appointments. Some people are hesitant or unwilling to get a shot.

The New York Times recently analyzed vaccine records and voter records in every county in the United States and found that both willingness to receive a coronavirus vaccine and actual vaccination rates were lower, on average, in counties where a majority of residents voted to re-elect former President Donald J. Trump in 2020.

Tracking the Coronavirus